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Truman Show Essay Film Techniques Used In Rear

visual text: The Truman Show

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Ank123



Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 4

Posted: 28 Oct 14 (22:17)    Post subject: visual text: The Truman Show

Describe at least ONE important decision that a character or individual had to make in the text(s).
Explain how the decision affected the character / individual OR events throughout the text(s),
supporting your points with visual and / or oral language features.


Hiya Ank123
Looking at this now
ET5


Comments attached below
ET5
CAN YOU PLEASE CHECK MY ESSAY AND TELL ME WHAT TO WORK ON AND GIVE ME A POSSIBLE GRADE THAT I WILL GET FOR THIS ESSAY.

In Peter Weir’s The Truman Show an important decision Truman made was to leave Seahaven. This decision helped illustrate the idea of Freedom. Peter Weir illustrates this idea through the use of over the shoulder shot of Truman looking at Sylvia and a midshot Truman not letting go of the rope. These cinematographic features enhance the effect that Weir presents to the audience.

An important decision made by Truman was when he decided to leave Seahaven which was controlled by Christoff. His decision helped me understand the idea of Freedom. An evidence illustrating his decision was a mid shot of Truman hanging on to the rope of the sailboat even after drowning. His expression in this shot shows us his determination to overcome the obstacles Christoff gives him in order to stay in Seahaven. Even though Christoff’s overpowering methods appear to have weakened Truman, Truman’s strong mentality helps him continue his journey to escape Seahaven. Truman’s character is therefore developing into a determined, and strong-minded individual. This effect was created by the use of the rope which Truman does not let go in the scene. It illustrates Truman’s strong opinion towards achieving freedom. his ability to think for himself is surprising as he was always influenced through other’s opinion. The purpose of this effect is to illustrate the courage Truman now has to overcome and oppose Christoff’s choices for him. He is now giving precedence to his ideas and opinions which allows the freedom of choice to enter his life.Here Peter Weir encourages us to allows us to underststand that freedom of thought is a right that we are all deserving of. However there are some who have to fight for this right. He encourages us to allow our own thoughts and opinions to control our actions. This not only helps develop the trust we have for ourselves but builds our personality to be strong-minded.

Another technique illustrating this decision was through a over the shoulder shot of Truman staring at Sylvia’s photo as he escapes Seahaven. This shows us how Sylvia stands to be a great inspiration in Truman’s life.Meeting Sylvia was his main intention to leave Seahaven.He is driven by her love to fight for his own freedom. His love for Sylvia was so powerful that he chose to sacrifice his secure lifestyle. We can see that Truman develops into a daring risk-taker. This effect was created through the use of the over-the shoulder shot focusing on Sylvia’s photo. It illustrates Truman’s great focus on escaping Seahavn in order to meet Sylvia. Therefore we are indirectly led to believe that he is willing to go to any extent to meet this goal. The purpose of this effect is to illustrate how courageous Truman is to break out of his secure lifestyle in Seahaven. His love for Sylvia encourages him to stand up against Christoff and fight for his own freedom. Here Peter Weir illustrates how powerful love is as an emotion. It overpowers over all our negative qualities and helps us fight for it no matter what. Therefore love stands to be great motivation for those fighting for their freedom.

I believe that Truman’s decision to leave Seahaven was extremely brave. This journey represented his fight for freedom.Through this fight Trumans character developed into a stronger individual. We also learn how love can be motivational force behind everyone of ours fight for freedom of thought. For Truman it brought out the hidden courageous, and bravery buried within him . I feel that he stands to be an inspiration to those out there who fight for their freedom of thoughts. He inspires each of them the courage and optimism that we have the power to attain freedom only through determination and self-believe.Like They say if you think you can, then you are right. If you think you can’t then you are also right.”
 Topic: visual text: The Truman Show
Ank123



Joined: 23 Oct 2014
Posts: 4

Posted: 31 Oct 14 (20:15)    Post subject: Truman Show practice Essay

Hi there, I did not receive comments for my last essay so please can u attach the comments and mark me on what to work on and please give me a possible grade I would receive. Thanks

Hi- we do not give grades.The comments for your essay are on the attachment at the bottom of your post.You just need to open it.
Will get to this one soon.
ET5


Hiya
I have already commented on this essay - it is the attachment on the above post on this thread.
ET5
Describe at least ONE important decision that a character or individual had to make in the text(s).
Explain how the decision affected the character / individual OR events throughout the text(s),
supporting your points with visual and / or oral language features.


In Peter Weir’s The Truman Show an important decision Truman made was to leave Seahaven. This decision helped illustrate the idea of Freedom. Peter Weir illustrates this idea through the use of over the shoulder shot of Truman looking at Sylvia and a midshot Truman not letting go of the rope. These cinematographic features enhance the effect that Weir presents to the audience.

An important decision made by Truman was when he decided to leave Seahaven which was controlled by Christoff. His decision helped me understand the idea of Freedom. An evidence illustrating his decision was a mid shot of Truman hanging on to the rope of the sailboat even after drowning. His expression in this shot shows us his determination to overcome the obstacles Christoff gives him in order to stay in Seahaven. Even though Christoff’s overpowering methods appear to have weakened Truman, Truman’s strong mentality helps him continue his journey to escape Seahaven. Truman’s character is therefore developing into a determined, and strong-minded individual. This effect was created by the use of the rope which Truman does not let go in the scene. It illustrates Truman’s strong opinion towards achieving freedom. his ability to think for himself is surprising as he was always influenced through other’s opinion. The purpose of this effect is to illustrate the courage Truman now has to overcome and oppose Christoff’s choices for him. He is now giving precedence to his ideas and opinions which allows the freedom of choice to enter his life.Here Peter Weir encourages us to allows us to underststand that freedom of thought is a right that we are all deserving of. However there are some who have to fight for this right. He encourages us to allow our own thoughts and opinions to control our actions. This not only helps develop the trust we have for ourselves but builds our personality to be strong-minded.

Another technique illustrating this decision was through a over the shoulder shot of Truman staring at Sylvia’s photo as he escapes Seahaven. This shows us how Sylvia stands to be a great inspiration in Truman’s life.Meeting Sylvia was his main intention to leave Seahaven.He is driven by her love to fight for his own freedom. His love for Sylvia was so powerful that he chose to sacrifice his secure lifestyle. We can see that Truman develops into a daring risk-taker. This effect was created through the use of the over-the shoulder shot focusing on Sylvia’s photo. It illustrates Truman’s great focus on escaping Seahavn in order to meet Sylvia. Therefore we are indirectly led to believe that he is willing to go to any extent to meet this goal. The purpose of this effect is to illustrate how courageous Truman is to break out of his secure lifestyle in Seahaven. His love for Sylvia encourages him to stand up against Christoff and fight for his own freedom. Here Peter Weir illustrates how powerful love is as an emotion. It overpowers over all our negative qualities and helps us fight for it no matter what. Therefore love stands to be great motivation for those fighting for their freedom.

I believe that Truman’s decision to leave Seahaven was extremely brave. This journey represented his fight for freedom.Through this fight Trumans character developed into a stronger individual. We also learn how love can be motivational force behind everyone of ours fight for freedom of thought. For Truman it brought out the hidden courageous, and bravery buried within him . I feel that he stands to be an inspiration to those out there who fight for their freedom of thoughts. He inspires each of them the courage and optimism that we have the power to attain freedom only through determination and self-believe.Like They say if you think you can, then you are right. If you think you can’t then you are also right.”
 Topic: visual text: The Truman Show
122strangerr



Joined: 10 Nov 2014
Posts: 2

Posted: 10 Nov 14 (16:11)    Post subject: Essay comments please :)

Hi there, my English Exam is on Wednesday so looking for a speeding reply if possible, so I can work on the feedback tomorrow!

Kia ora 122strangerr,

Great to see you on the forums - everyone is in countdown mode for the exams so we try to be as speedy as possible.

To find out more about Studyit spend some time going through the PowerPoint here.

Have you seen English Level 1 on Studyit?

Please Read this BEFORE posting on Level 1 English .

Feedback attached.

ET14


The question was about explaining an idea within the visual text and how it is relevant to the youth of today.

Our obsession with entertainment overwhelms our ability to respect truth and reality. In the news and on TV, in the movies and within “reality” TV shows, we see this obsession take over our lives. Hollywood, of all places, has created a movie which exposes this idea and shows how this obsession can be taken too far. In Peter Weir’s “The Truman Show”, Truman is unknowingly the star of a worldwide TV show, in which his everyday life is watched by millions of viewers. Peter Weir has used dialogue and props, to show how the shows creators and viewers are unable to respect the truth and reality of Truman’s world, all for the sake of entertainment.

To show this idea of how our obsession with entertainment overwhelms our ability to respect the truth, Peter Weir uses props, to show how engrossed the viewers are with the show. Throughout the film there are cutaway shots from Truman’s world, to people watching him at home on TV. Our understanding that this show is a worldwide obsession, comes from how these recurring watchers speak different languages and come from different races. Each recurring watcher has props within their surroundings that give us an idea of the scale of the show. Two older woman hold pillows with Trumans face on them, dearly in their arms. From this prop we see that they think of him as a son or grandchild that is very close to them, and important in their lives. An asian family sit at their dining table watching the Truman show. They are adorned with merchandise. One is wearing a Truman sweater, the others wear Truman and Meryl (his “wife”) badges. The family even have Truman and Meryl wall hangings in their home. One large group of watchers are even watching from a Truman bar, with Truman posters, aprons and plates all around them. The problem with these viewers is that, despite their obvious love for the show, their props and merchandise clearly show that his life has become an obsession to them. These many groups of people are so engrossed and entertained by the Truman show that they forget that he is a human being, imprisoned in a world that he does not realise is fake. The relevance to us as young people is that we are so often the targeted consumers for film and TV merchandise. Due to this, we are capable of falling into the trap of excessive buying, without thinking of the truth or values within a film or, more specifically, ‘reality” TV show. We can’t become like the Truman show viewers, who think of Truman the TV star and not Truman the human being.

Another technique that was used to show this idea was dialogue. Through dialogue, Weir makes us question Christof’s (the shows creator) sanity and moral compass. In the scene where Truman is trying to escape, in a boat on a storm lashed sea, a network executive becomes alarmed by how far Christof is willing to go. “For Gods sake Chris! The whole world is watching. We can’t let him die in front of a live audience!” Christof replies without hesitation, “He was born in front of a live audience.” This dialogue shows Christof justifying Truman’s possible death as an extension of the entertainment. It shows very clearly how obsessed Christof has become with the need to entertain the world and keep Truman from discovering the truth. Not only is he keeping the truth from Truman, but he is also holding his life in the palm of his hand, without questioning the morality of his actions. I believe that Weir intended to shock the audience with the dialogue from this scene. He is showing us that even we, the movie watchers sometimes forget how morally wrong the situation in the movie is.

As young people we need to understand the line between entertainment and what is morally wrong. Teenagers too often get caught up in religiously watching the latest “reality” TV show that we completely forget the question, ie is what we are watching real. Although the Truman show is an extreme example of this, smaller scale examples of this deceit are ongoing within ‘reality TV shows. A large percentage of the content is set up or staged. I believe Weir’s goal was to entertain us with the film, but more importantly, bring to light the idea that our obsession with entertainment overwhelms our ability to respect the truth. Through use of props we can see how the viewers think more of Truman the TV star, rather than Truman the human being. Through dialogue, we can see how Christof will go to any lengths to entertain and keep the show running, even if it means killing his star and losing his own morality. Despite being made in 1986, it seems to have even more relevance to the youth of today, as our entertainment seems to be based more and more on a fake kind of reality. This movie should make us question how far we would all push our morals and respect for the truth, just for the sake of being entertained.
 Topic: visual text: The Truman Show
aurorain



Joined: 02 Nov 2014
Posts: 11

Posted: 10 Nov 14 (22:38)    Post subject: Truman Show

Hiya English teachers I'm doing an essay on 'The Truman Show' as well, and I would really love some feedback for it...

Describe at least ONE important conflict. Explain how the conflict helped you to understand at least one character or individuals OR events in the texts, supporting your points with visual and/or oral language features.

Conflicts occur when two or more beliefs oppose eahc other as tensions rise, but however, that can provide the opportunity to present characteristics and beliefs that the involved gold. In Paul Weir's 'The Truman Show', characters Truman Burbank and Christoff are seen in a conflict as they both have differing opinions on whether Truman should leave Seahaven or not. This conflict is important into understanding the character of Truman, as the interactions that follow it provides the opportunity to present his characteristics and beliefs through the use of camerawork and dialogue.

The conflict between Truman and Christoff makes the audience gain an understanding of Truman by providing the opportunity to showcase his strong belief for adventure. For example, this is shown through during the conflict in a close up shot of Truman pondering about his decision whether to leave Seahaven or not, as Christoff watches him through a screen. However, this only lasts for a minute or less until Truman finally decides to leave Seahven. Truman is also seen in a flashback, as a youth climbing a hill of rocks on a beach, to which his father stops him. From the conflict, the audience understands Truman that albeit in his thirties, his passion for adventure as a youth has not died out. This is because effectively, Truman has decided to throw away his perfect life in Seahaven, for a completely whole new world to experience. We understand that he is a strong believer in adventure, so much so that his belief for adventure has not died for decades and will possibly never die out. This can also be seen in the real world today whereas our passions also drive us to take bold steps in the world, like Truman when he decides to venture out into a new world. Perhaps, our passions and the decisions we can make from them are also for the better. Overall, Truman's conflict with Christoff helps the audience understand Truman as it provides the opportunity to show to the audience his strong belief of adventure.

Through Truman's conflict with Christoff, and the resulting decisions made after it, the audience gains understanding of Truman as we see that he has never believed his life in Seahaven to be satisfactory. This is shown where in the conflict in a medium shot, we see Truman exclaim: "In case I don't see ya, good afternoon, good evening, and good night!", following by a bow in a wide shot. This shows that Truman never has to say that statement again in his life and the bow signifies to the audience that his 'performance' in Seahaven is over. This conflict with Christoff has resultingly led to the idea that Truman has never believed Seahaven to be enjoyable. This is because we see that Truman is so definite about his decision to leave Seahaven, that he even has his statement and bow to back it up. The fact that it also took him mere seconds before making his life changing decision shows that his life in Seahaven was not even worth more time to think about and not worth a second consideration. Truman believed that his life in Seahaven was so bad, that he threw it away for an unknown world. This can also be seen in the real world today whereas people tend to make quick and drastic decisions if they are put into the spot. However, we sometimes need to pause and really spend time on thinking over decisions that will change our life. As a result of the conflict between Truman and Christoff, the audience understands the Truman as we see that he has never believed his life in Seahaven to be satisfactory.

The conflict between Truman and Christoff helps the audience gain further understanding of Truman as it provides the opportunity to present his characteristic of self-strength. This is shown whereas during the conflict, in an over-the-shoulder shot of Christoff stroking Truman's face on a screen, he says "I have watched you grow up". In response, Truman shakes it off and replies "You've never been in my head!". This shows that although Christoff, the figurehead of manipulation and censorship in the film, has grown an attachment to Truman, Truman declines an attachment to Christoff. This can be further extended, whereas having grown up in a world full of manipulation and censorship created by Christoff, Truman is strong enough to decline it when directly presented with manipulation and censorship (Christoff). This can be linked into society today whereas to stand up to your problems, instead of accepting them, you should front and defy them just like Truman to manipulation and censorship. Overall this conflict was important because it provided the opportunity to present Truman's characteristic of self-strength, increasing the audience's understanding of Truman's character.

All in all, the conflict between Christoff and Truman is important and significant as it helped the audience understand Truman's character through his characteristics and beliefs. It has led to the ideas that Truman is a strong believer in adventure, he has never believed that his life in Seahaven was satisfactory, and that he holds the characteristic of having self strength. Therefore, the conflict between Christoff and Truman enhances the audience's understanding of Truman.

This is a well structured essay aurorain. You cover both parts of the question and provide good, clear examples. One thing you could do, is add a sentence to each body paragraph which discusses the message the director is trying to give to the audience about being adventurous, never giving up on your dreams etc. The director has Truman make these decisions because he wants the audience to think - what does he want us to think?

All the best,
ET8
 Topic: visual text: The Truman Show
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  • 1

    The Truman Show begins with the opening credits for "The Truman Show", the fictional television show, and not for the film itself. What does this say about the artificiality of movies and the way we view things?

    In certain instances throughout the film, Peter Weir differentiates between "The Truman Show" cameras and The Truman Show cameras, and concurrently, there are points when the film and the television show are one and the same. The opening credits are an immediate way for Weir to draw his viewer's attention to the artifice of film and television. We only know that the credits are fictional because we recognize Ed Harris, Laura Linney and Noah Emmerich as actors - but the film itself does not acknowledge them as so. Similarly, Truman has no way of knowing that the people around him are professional actors - he can only react to the information he is given.

  • 2

    Despite Christof's various manipulations over the course of Truman's life, Truman still feels an unshakeable sense of wanderlust at the beginning of the film. What does this say about human nature?

    As Truman matures, he develops a sense of curiosity about the world, and is less gullible when Christof and his team manufacture rational explanations for every unexpected event in his life. Curiosity is an essential part of human nature, and just as Eve could not resist the apple, Truman cannot resist exploring the root of his paranoia. Perhaps he will hate the world outside Seahaven and come running back inside - but at least he will have agency over his life. His actions will be based on truth.

  • 3

    As Truman starts to recognize the artificiality of his world, he also takes more control over his life. Describe his journey to empowerment using key scenes in the film as examples of his development.

    Truman is skeptical when the cinema light falls from the sky, but doesn't think much of it. However, he realizes that something is going on when Kirk (his father) reappears - and this time, he won't take no for an answer. He trusts what he has seen with his own eyes and can no longer ignore his suspicions. Similarly, when he hears the production walkie-talkies over his car radio identifying his exact location, he pushes the limits of his suspicion, leading "The Truman Show" crew scrambling to keep up the artifice. When he kidnaps Meryl and tries to drive away, he realizes that she is in on the lies and that he is all alone. Finally, when he outsmarts Christof and his crew and escapes on a boat, he has conquered his greatest fear in order to continue his quest for the truth.

  • 4

    Christof manufactures Truman's relationships to keep him in the dark. Describe how his mother, Meryl, and Marlon subtly manipulate Truman, taking advantage of his weaknesses to make him stay in Seahaven.

    Meryl quells Truman's impulses to travel by reminding him about the practical concerns in life - having a baby, paying off their mortgage, retirement. Truman's mother, Angela, subtly reminds Truman of the pain and guilt he associates with traveling on or over water by suggesting that Truman is responsible for his father's death. Marlon plays an "everyman" who always tells Truman that his life is wonderful and there is nothing out there to top what he has in Seahaven. Marlon serves as a kind of therapist, trying to connect Truman's mounting paranoia to the way most human beings react to maturing and having increased responsibility.

  • 5

    Compare and contrast the relationships that Truman has with Meryl and Lauren/Sylvia. What do these two romances say about the authenticity and nature of love?

    Meryl does everything by the book. She plays a damsel in distress and falls on Truman, she smiles, flirts, supports him, and lionizes him. She plays her role of a wife with gusto. However, she does not love Truman in her heart, and he realizes this. Lauren/Sylvia, however, only has a few actual interactions with Truman, but she leaves an impression on him. She truly cares about him and puts herself at risk when she tries to tell him the truth about his life. Truman's framed photograph of Meryl is symbolic of his relationships with these two women. In the frame is Meryl, the posed, fake, woman who shares Truman's life. Hidden behind Meryl's picture is a collage of features that resemble Lauren/Sylvia, a real woman based on Truman's memories. All he has of her is an image in his mind, but he cherishes her more than Meryl - because what Truman and Lauren/Sylvia have is real.

  • 6

    Christof indicates that he thinks Truman is protected on Seahaven Island, describing it as his version of a utopia. However, Truman still wants to break out - what does this say about the division between utopia and dystopia?

    A utopia is a place where everything is perfect and well-ordered, and everyone is happy. A dystopia is the opposite, and the inhabitants of a dystopia are often under the thumb of a totalitarian government or dictator. Seahaven Island may seem like a utopia at first because everyone is happy, Weir slowly reveals the dystopian power that Christof possesses. All of Truman's life is a lie, and Christof has trapped him on the island using a variety of hidden barriers. Therefore, the utopia is an illusion, and when Truman tries to escape - the curtain falls away, revealing the dystopian reality within.

  • 7

    Describe the fears that Truman must conquer in order to face the "truth" at the end of the film

    Truman is afraid of anyone finding out about his innermost desires (he makes secret phone calls to Fiji and keeps Lauren/Sylvia's sweater hidden in his trunk). He is afraid of letting people down (he is concerned when Laurence warns him about his job). He is afraid of water and air travel because of all the mishaps that seem to accompany them - notably the death of his father. However, Truman is able to conquer all his fears - he knows he has to do this in order to have a chance at figuring out the truth. Once he overcomes his fears and faces his own mortality - he is free.

  • 8

    Discuss the significance of the film's ending, namely: Weir never shows the audience what happens to Truman after he steps out of the Seahaven dome, and the fact that the security guards, both devoted Truman viewers, look for "something else to watch." What does this say about the audiences - both of "The Truman Show" and of the film?

    While Truman ends the film on his quest for truth, his viewers are looking for another manufactured illusion to lose themselves in. Weir points out the omnipotence of the media in this way - it is a commercialization of human life, profiting off of our unfulfilled desires. Whatever we may not find in our lives, we can live vicariously through television. While Truman is able to break the chains of Christof's gilded prison, his viewers prefer the illusion to the reality.

  • 9

    Describe the difference in the way Weir films "The Truman Show" (the fictional show) and The Truman Show (Peter Weir's film). How do these visual choices inform Weir's message?

    Peter Weir clearly indicates the images that come from the "The Truman Show" surveillance cameras. The footage from these cameras is often from odd angles or from behind various surfaces. It looks like surveillance footage because of the frequent vignette effect - like a camera positioned far away and zoomed in on Truman. Weir's own camera, however, is one step closer to Truman at certain points to reveal the artifice of Truman's world. For example, Weir shows the world outside of Seahaven Island - Christof's control center, Truman's loyal viewers, and illuminates various cracks in Christof's carefully constructed facade that Truman does not notice. However, especially towards the end of the film, there is no differentiation between these two perspectives - especially when Truman makes his grand escape to sea. This is Weir's way of drawing a parallel between the artifice of "The Truman Show" and any media that we, as viewers, willingly consume and believe as truth.

  • 10

    Weir never reveals Truman's true feelings about the return of his "father." What does this choice say about Truman's character at this point in the film? Do you think that Truman was convinced by Marlon's speech - why or why not?

    Weir shows the audience the reunion between Truman and his father from Christof's perspective - in the control room. Christof is more concerned about how to frame the moment for the most emotional impact - zoom in, music swells, cue close-up - than about how this manipulated version of reality might affect Truman himself. Similarly, Christof bases Marlon's speech on his own perceptions of Truman - it is not rooted in Marlon's real feelings. Therefore, there is now a growing divide between the version of Truman that Christof presents to his audience and Truman's own self - the two were once much more closely linked. It is possible that Truman doubts the sincerity of Marlon's speech - but he keeps this secret hidden inside him. He is so exposed at all times that this is the only way Truman can protect himself.

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